press

A 5-post collection

L16 Update

L16 Update

We’re going to keep this update short and sweet ;) The L16 is out in the wild. Cameras from our EVT builds have been circling the globe for the past two months, taking incredible photos along the way. You’ll see some of the photography we’re most proud of on our social media accounts in the coming weeks. Be sure to follow us on Facebook and Instagram to catch the latest. Paris, captured by Bradley Lautenbach Yosemite, captured by Kelly Van Arsdale Our internal beta testing has already led to several major improvements in device performance and image quality. External beta testing is scheduled to

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Light's camera technology explained

Our cofounders, Dave and Rajiv, have sat for several interviews recently to dive deeper into Light's camera technology. Highlights below, but we encourage you to read the articles in their entirety. Ina Fried, who interviewed the team for re/code, wrote: From a small space in Palo Alto, Calif., startup Light is looking to turn the camera industry on its head ... Light tries to emulate digitally what a big zoom lens does through expensive glass lenses. It aggregates the data from the different cameras to create both optical zoom and high-resolution images. Light has applied for a bunch of patents to cover aspects of its approach,

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reveal roundup

reveal roundup

On Friday, we revealed the Light camera technology to the MIT Technology Review. Rachel Metz wrote: Most digital cameras are limited by a key aspect of their design: they have one lens and one image sensor. Light hits the lens and is directed at the sensor to produce a picture. A photography startup called Light is not making most digital cameras, though. Rather than hewing to this one-to-one ratio, Light aims to put a bunch of small lenses, each paired with its own image sensor, into smartphones and other gadgets. They’ll fire simultaneously when you take a photo, and software will automatically combine the images.

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first look at Light's camera technology

Rachel Metz of the MIT Technology Review dropped by the office last week, and penned a piece about our camera technology. She wrote: Light is taking advantage of radical declines in the cost, weight, and size of optics that have happened as smartphones took over the cell phone market and, for many people, became their go-to camera. Unlike costly camera lenses that are made of glass, most smartphone camera lenses are made of plastic that’s stamped from molds. It is a much cheaper process, but the quality of images may not be as good. And you rarely see optical zoom squished onto a smartphone camera.

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series a

Today we announced our Series A funding. You can read more at re/code or in this press release.

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